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The London Community Rehabilitation Company works with offenders to help them lead responsible and law abiding lives.
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Disclosing your conviction

The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 outlaws discrimination against ex-offenders.

It gives people with spent convictions and cautions the right not to disclose them when applying for most jobs, and for other products and services such as buying a house or insurance.

Certain criminal convictions are ‘spent’ (forgotten) after a rehabilitation period.  This period varies according to the offence. Apart from those given prison sentences of  more than four years, most people with convictions will benefit from the Act as some point in their lives.

The LASPO (Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders) Act 2012 which came into force in March 2014 changed the rehabilitation period.

The new rehabilitation period is the period of the sentence – which includes the time spent on licence – plus a buffer period which applies from the end of the sentence.

More information can be found by visiting: http://hub.unlock.org.uk/knowledgebase/spent-now-brief-guide-changes-roa/

 

For people aged 18 years or over at the time of conviction:

  • Community orders become spent after the length of the order plus one year.
  • Prison sentences up to six months become spent after the length of the sentence plus two years.
  • Prison sentences more than six and less than (or equal to) 30 months become spent after the length of the sentence plus four years.
  • Prison sentences more than 30 months and less than (or equal to) four years become spent after the length of the sentence plus seven years.
  • Sentences over four years or public protection sentences are never spent.

You don’t need to disclose spent convictions when applying for most jobs.  Under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 it’s unlawful for an employer to discriminate on the grounds of a spent conviction.  However, some types of jobs are exempt from this Act – this means you have to disclose spent convictions as well as unspent ones.

 

Jobs where you have to disclose spent convictions include:

  • Working with children and vulnerable adults, such as elderly and disabled people
  • Senior roles in banking and the financial services industry
  • Certain posts connected to law enforcement, including the judiciary and the police
  • Work involving national security
  • Certain posts in the prison service
  • Certain professions in areas such as health, pharmacy and the law
  • Private security work.

For more information about disclosing your conviction to employers, please speak to your offender manager, or visit the National Careers Service website.

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